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BUCKEYE THROUGH BUTLER BIN

12 photo(s) Updated on: 01/08/2021
  • This interpretive sign tells the story - only through 2016, and much has since been done! - of the Buckeye Model 3 Trench Excavator. Someday it will be restored to resemble this factory photograph.
  • The Trench Excavator is powered by a four-cylinder, high torque and low rpm marine engine, ideal for turning a propeller in the water and moving a bucket line through the ground.
  • The Trench Excavator as it was in 2019. The rear two-thirds of the frame was fabricated by Museum Volunteers using donated angle and channel iron.
  • This small Buckeye 403 trencher was built in 1961. The boom is lowered down the track beneath it to a nearly vertical position to dig manholes and in close quarters.
  • A cable backhoe like this 1945 Bucyrus-Erie 15-B operates by gravity and force - the bucket is drawn back, lowered by weight, drawn up through the ground, then raised and pulled back to dump.
  • Developed in 1946, the Hydrocrane was the first true hydraulic crane. This 1951 Bucyrus-Erie H-3 rides on a GMC carrier. The upper works swings left and right in a limited arc by cable power.
  • The Hydrocrane raises and lowers the hook through the action of vertical sheaves in the back; they move up in down in a hydraulic carriage, taking the cable with them. (Ron Wozniak photo)
  • A churn drill like this 1948 Bucyrus-Erie 27-T drills holes into rock by dropping, twisting and raising a pointed spud like the action of a butter churn.
  • These three mid-to-late 1930s Buffalo-Springfield rollers came as a set from their original owner.
  • The larger of the two Buffalo-Springfield tandem rollers probably weighs 8 to 10 tons. It was built in 1935 or 1936; note the riveted construction.
  • This 1938 Buffalo-Springfield tandem roller weighs about five tons. Tandem rollers have two full-width drums, where a three-wheel has a front steering drum and two large wheels in back.
  • Built in 1951, the Butler Bin Company Carscoop was designed for industrial usages such as unloading box cars and ship holds. It steers from a two-wheel bogie under the back seat.
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